A recent publication in the American Malacological Bulletin

Well, the paper is officially available, so it can be blog fodder. Like many entomologists when

You can see the snail resting on the frass plug of a Dectes texanus overwintering chamber!

You can see the snail resting on the frass plug of a Dectes texanus overwintering chamber!

asked about snails, I instantly think: Scaphinotus! Well snails are much more than mere food units, like insects, mollusks are increasingly being recognized as having mental capabilities. This manuscript was about how curiosity may have killed the snail, because this snail was found inside of an intact, Dectes texanus tunneled, soybean stem! This snail’s mental prowess did not help out in this situation- as demonstrated by the snail corpse.

The idea of micro-snails alone many be new to many, and the idea of micro-snails within no-till soybean fields may be disconcerting to some folks, but the idea of micro-snails inside of plants should bother most people. At the very least it should garner a: ‘what the heck?’. I know at my house we are now constantly vigilant for snails in unexpected places, and don’t even get me started about slugs…

Fothergill, K., K.V. Tindall, R.A. Salisbury, and G. Lorenz. 2013. An unusual habitat record for the land snail, Columella simplex (Gould, 1841) (Stylommatophora: Pupillidae), from Arkansas. American Malacological Bulletin 31.1: 91-93.

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